Dartmoor model shoot with GFX ( NSFW )

I took one of my regular models ( Pheonix Red ) down to Dartmoor for the day recently and shot with the GFX.  We had a great time and I used three lenses.  First up, the 32-64mm f4...

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I also played around a bit with a Minolta 45mm f2 and Kipon adapter.  I'm not very good with this lens at the moment but getting slowly better.  Here are two images ( one is a boudoir one from the hotel we were in ).

 

Minolta 45mm f2 @f2

Minolta 45mm f2 @f2

Minolta 45mm f2 @f2.

Minolta 45mm f2 @f2.

Most of the images were shot on the 120mm F4 Macro, which I am totally in love with. Yes the 110 is nice, but I really do prefer the look I get from this lens, there is something about it.  I thoroughly tested the weather sealing on the camera again needless to say.  It rained quite a bit and then we got some awesome atmospheric fog which was perfect for moody black and white art nude shots.  The GFX did a stellar job and I enjoyed using all three lenses.  I'm intrigued by some of the AF adapters now coming out for Canon glass so I expect I'll be looking into that, but the 120 and 32-64 are perfect for 90% of what I shoot.

120mm f4

120mm f4

120mm F4

120mm F4

120mm f4

120mm f4

120mm f4

120mm f4

Direct light and why I love it - Totally NSFW!

OK so this is part rant, part attempt to explain how I like to do things.  There is a trend these days for very pretty, soft, backlit shots taken in the early morning or evening, during golden hour.  There is nothing wrong with this, it's great light and very flattering.  I use it myself when I'm shooting engagements and even on model shoots.  But I am bored to death with this style, I see it everywhere.  It's always shot wide open, so you lose any sense of an awesome location, and it's just so...meh.  How good the image is then comes down to processing techniques, and those Russian photographers have this nailed.  Plus they seem to have an unending supply of gorgeous models with killer cheekbones.  Anyway, I digress.  I like direct light. 

Many photographers believe you need to kill direct light with flash, but I don't agree.  You just need to find an angle.  This shot is one of my favourites of this year and was shot at 2pm on a bright sunny day using direct light.

 

The angle of light is key here.

The angle of light is key here.

Direct light will give you very punchy images and really bring out the colour if you shoot it right.  And it will give you a look you just don't see that often.  It's not easy to get a decent angle at midday, but at any other time it's possible to get the light shining more or less at an angle that won't create horrible shadows.  You just need to work it.  And then if you do get up early, or stay for golden hour, the direct light takes on a different colour and just looked amazing.

 

Shot at 7am in the morning.

Shot at 7am in the morning.

Direct morning light in Iceland.  No way to use a strobe or backlight here.

Direct morning light in Iceland.  No way to use a strobe or backlight here.

Direct light in Iceland again.  Morning light is very warm, because of all the crap it passes though in the atmosphere!

Direct light in Iceland again.  Morning light is very warm, because of all the crap it passes though in the atmosphere!

So, don't be scared of direct light, just find your angle:)

 

Studio glamour on the GFX 50s - VERY NSFW you have been warned!

I had a quick shoot with a friend of mine, Chloe, recently and used the GFX50s along with the 120mm f4 and the 32-64 mm f4.  I'm really starting to love that 120, it's so punchy and sharp.  I've got to admit, having seen a load of images from the 110, I'm glad I went for this one.  The 110 images look to me just like any other fast 85 on a full frame camera, nice bokeh etc but I think the 120 has way more character to the images.  That's entirely subjective of course and probably biased due to me owning the 120.  

Anyway, onto the shoot.  Most of these images were shot with the 120, with the exception of the mono seated shot.  I was at f8 or f11 most of the time, ISO 100, shutter speed 1/125 ( yay for image stablisation! ).  Lighting setups were fairly simple, single octabox mostly.  The coloured gel shot with the green background was a 4 light setup, but any time you introduce gels then it quickly gets more complex.  Time for the shots.  Chloe had an eye infection hence the eyepatch, but I really love the eyepatch look and think she made it work really well.

 

 

I did add some texture to the background in Photoshop here 

I did add some texture to the background in Photoshop here 

Used a hair light to add some flare here.

Used a hair light to add some flare here.

My favourite of the set, 4 light set up.

My favourite of the set, 4 light set up.

32-64 mm at f8.  Loved the attitude of this one.

32-64 mm at f8.  Loved the attitude of this one.

Another shoot with Pheonix Red - NSFW

I've not had what you would call a muse before.  I've completed maybe 350 odd shoots, and they have mostly been with different models.  However, Pheonix lives very close to me and we share very similar tastes in what we like to shoot, so it may be that these shoots become a regular thing, I hope so, as the first two have been great.  We headed out to my favourite woodland area near Ufton Nervet in Berkshire to shoot some fairly random ideas.  I wanted to test out the HSS on my Godox AD200, but other than that had no real plan.  I bought some LED lights to create some fun bokeh effects as well and was shooting with the GFX 50s and 32-64 and 120 F4, which is kind of all I need these days for model shoots.

 

This is a nice enough image and I love the outfit, but its basically the first set, and the first set is where you get warmed up and get all the gear working.  I'd like to reshoot this outfit with Pheonix on another shoot as I think we could get more out of it.

This is where we start to hit our stride and I truly love this image.  We started using the band of little LED lights on Pheonix, but that didn't really work so I hung them on a branch and shot through them.  I used the AD200 to even out the light on Red's face.  Didn't need to use HSS as I was at f4 and it was a dull day.

As soon as I saw this large patch of purple heather I knew we had to shoot with it.  We tried first with some purple cloth but that didn't work quite as well.  Some more transparent purple material might have done the job.  As it was, we defaulted to art nude and I'm really happy with this shot. I used the 120mm f4 and had the AD200 firing through an umbrella off to the left of the model ( my left ).  I love all the colour and texture in this image.

This is my favourite shot of the day and also the last set we did.  For most of the shots we hung the red material from a branch across from the model.  It looked great in camera but not so great when I looked on the laptop at the images.  For one of the shots the material came off the branch and floated down just like in the image.  So I composited two images together and this is the end result, which I truly love.  The light was the AD200 off to the side aimed at the models face through an umbrella.  The shot took about 10 minutes in total to get, shot with the 32-64 lens on the GFX.  

Fuji GFX 32-64 mm F4 review ( NSFW )

I only own two lenses for the GFX 50s, the 32-64 and the 120 F4 macro.  Why only two I hear you ask?  Well, I'm not a full time pro and although I'm a part time pro I still can't afford to splash out on more than these two ( currently, once some more of my organs sell on ebay who knows? How many kidneys do you really need anyway?).  Joking aside, these two lenses pretty much cover everything I need for model photography at the moment.  OK so I can't do mega shallow depth of field with this zoom, but I didn't buy this camera for that reason.  So lets get down to the review.

This lens roughly equates to 25-51mm on a full frame camera.  It's kinda sorta like a 24-70 but more restricted at the long end.  It's also "only" F4, but on a medium format camera, thats plenty IMO unless you want everyone's ears out of focus.  There is no OIS on this lens, unlike the 120mm F4, so I would humbly suggest this is not a great low light lens unless your subject is sat very still and you have a tripod.  Build quality is superb as you would expect for the price tag, and it is weather sealed.

Sharpness:

This is one of the sharpest zoom lenses I've ever shot with.  It smokes every 24-70 I've ever shot with for sharpness( including the Canon 24-70 mk2, which was a great lens, but very boring ).  It's better at the wide end but still amazing in the centre at the long end.  I've never been a great fan of the 24-70 lens, I prefer prime lenses in general.  However, this lens is awesome, I love it.  It allows you to get some fairly epic wide angle shots while retaining amazing detail and sharpness.  As a fashion/portrait photographer I'm a sucker for wide angle shots and this thing delivers in spades.  Until now for this kind of shot I've been using the 16mm 1.4 on my Fuji X cameras, but since I got this lens it hasn't got a look in ( and that 16mm 1.4 is something special ).

46.5 mm on the 32-64 F4

46.5 mm on the 32-64 F4

Shot at 44m f4 using a godox AD200 for fill flash

Shot at 44m f4 using a godox AD200 for fill flash

Image Quality:

I'm not into the technical stuff I'm afraid, but suffice to say for my purposes ( model photography ), this lens is simply superb and the only lens I use for wide angle fashion.  It's very versatile as you can shoot wider portraits with it as well and it even does very nice bokeh at the long end.   The detail you get from this lens and the camera is fantastic.  Most zooms in this range have disappointed me, not this one.  It's also pretty awesome for group shots at weddings.

Shot at 64mm f4

Shot at 64mm f4

Shot at 64 on the 32-64, f4

Shot at 64 on the 32-64, f4

So I initially bought the 63mm 2.8 and used that on a shoot.  I found it a bit limited even though I quite like the 50mm focal length.  I got to thinking, why not get this zoom instead and have a much more flexible lens with only one stop of light less.  And I've been very pleased I did that.  One major drawback when I got this lens was the sync speed of 1/125 on the camera.  This effectively meant that when using strobes/speedlights with this lens I would need a tripod to be 100% sure of a sharp image, as its quite heavy and I don't get a 100% hit rate at 1/125.  Since then Godox has released its new trigger enabling HSS and it works wonderfully, so one of the main drawbacks of this lens and camera combo has for me, at least, been resolved.

Here are some more images I've shot with this lens.

30 sec exposure cropped in.

30 sec exposure cropped in.

My son throwing stuff.

My son throwing stuff.

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Conclusion:

This lens is brilliant.  I can't really think of much to say that's negative about it.  OIS would have been nice, as would a slightly faster aperture, but then I would not have been able to afford it.  I'm using it for group shots at weddings, epic wide angles for couple shots/engagements, but mostly for wide angle model shots where you want to include the environment.  Its very sharp, the images have amazing detail and punch, and I could not be happier with this lens, it is the perfect complement to my 120mm F4 and I love the results I get from it.  I'm just not used to a zoom of this focal length delivering images this sharp and detailed.

Agency test shoot with the GFX

So I did a test shoot for BMA in London, a really cool model agency.  They sent me three models for the day, which meant we had to shoot pretty fast to get everything done.  I used the GFX and the 32-64, but mostly the 120mm F4 which is just awesome as a studio lens.  Here are a few of the images.  These are not as creative as I normally like to be on model shoots, but I was trying to stick to a brief the agency gave me.  The GFX did a great job though and made it easy for me.

 

Fuji GFX 120mm F4 Macro Review

This will not be an overtly technical review, there are plenty of those already out there for those who need to know about chromatic aberration and that sort of stuff.  This is more, what is it like to use, what do I use it for and what do I think of it?  I've been using this lens now for two months on a variety of projects so here are my thoughts, along with some pictures of course.

First off, this is a macro lens, albeit a 1:2 macro lens not a 1:1.  This basically means you can't get as close as you would with a 1:1.  However, the insane resolution of the GFX means its quite easy to just crop in on the final image.  Now I am no macro photographer, but I do shoot weddings, and bridal shoots and all that sort of thing, so its very handy for me to be able to get high quality detail shots with the lens I also use for portraits.  For me, this is one of the main reasons I've chosen this lens over the 110 F2, its more flexible.

 

120mm Macro f4.5 1/250

120mm Macro f4.5 1/250

The other reason I chose the 120mm is the OIS.  It is the only lens in the GFX lineup with optical image stabilisation.  I find this incredibly useful when using flash, where the sync speed is 1/125.  With these big heavy lenses I can't be sure of a sharp image at 1/125 without either a tripod or OIS, and you wouldn't believe how often I forget my tripod on shoots ( ok so I'm an idiot, but I don't like tripods in general ).  The OIS just makes it a more flexible lens I can use anywhere.

 

So, we've covered OIS, and the macro side ( kinda ), what about for portraits and shots like the above?  Well, it isn't the bokeh monster that the 110 F2 is, but I don't need it to be.  It's produces razor sharp, punchy, contrasty images that I really like and I find f4 is perfectly adequate for me almost all the time, f2 would be a bit too thin a DOF for my style of photography.  Certainly when I'm testing for agencies, they wouldn't be impressed if parts of the model's face are out of focus because I shot it at f2.  Even at f4, with this focal length, you get a very pleasing background separation.  Some people have said it's a bit too sharp and unforgiving for a portrait lens, and I do kind of agree, you have to be very careful if your subject does not have good skin.  I recently did a shoot for an agency where I used this lens with a beauty dish, which is a hard(ish) light and the skin retouching was a bit of a pain.  I then switched to a big, soft Octa and it was fine.  So do bear that in mind when using this lens, it's not that forgiving if you don't get the lighting right.  

Personally, for those times when I want crazy bokeh, I'm going to get a Fotodiox adapter and some legacy lenses and use those, but I can understand a lot of people preferring the 110 F2.  If you just use natural light for your portraits, or constant lights, I can see the 110 F2 being a better bet, but I'm very often using strobes or flashguns and I don't want to always have a tripod on me, so for me the 120mm works better.  I'm also a bit bored of everyone obsessing about bokeh, it's a nice tool to have, but there is no point going to awesome locations to photograph your subjects and then just obliterating the background because you can!!

Here are a few more images from this awesome lens.  

 

As for weather sealing, its good:)  That shot of Shannon with the horse was shot in very typical British weather, rain.  I used it all day in that weather and it was fine.  

So..where and what do I use this lens for?  Well, mostly I use it for shooting models.  I test for agencies and I also shoot personal projects for fun, and its a fantastic lens for people photography.  I've used it at a wedding, and on an engagement shoot, and I can see myself shooting many couple portraits with it.  Some people might prefer the 110 F2 for that sort of work, but when I'm shooting 2 people there is no way I'm shooting f2 on a medium format, as they won't always be on exactly the same focal plane and I don't want to be messing around with a tripod on an engagement shoot.  I don't really use it for shooting family shots, its too big and heavy and my kids tend to notice when I point it in their direction and immediately adopt big cheesy grins or just hide their faces.  For that sort of thing I have the X system cameras, and I use those to shoot the majority of the wedding.  The GFX comes out to play for detail shots with this lens, for the couple portraits, and for the group shots with the 32-64mm lens ( another awesome bit of glass, review coming soon on that one ).

Here is a quick example of how the GFX has given me some new options.  On the beach shoot with my friend Coco the other day, she was wearing some awesome accessories.  It's been very easy for me to just crop right in and give the suppliers some nice closeups.  This always makes their day and helps improve my reputation out there amongst people who might then recommend me to their friends.  Here is the main image, shot with the 120 in direct morning light...

 

And here is the closeup...it's not perfect, had I been a bit more with it I'd have shot some deliberate closeups, but Coco didn't tell me they were custom nail extensions at the time.  Even so, just on the images from this shoot alone the supplier wants to book me for a job.

 

 

I know this review is a bit of a ramble, but when I looked for reviews of this lens there were very few with the kind of images I'm interested in ( Jonas Rask does some of the best fuji reviews, his images are awesome ).  I'm not that interested in pictures of bookshelves or bushes, for me this lens is used on people mostly and that's what I've tried to show.  This is how I use it, I'm still very much learning to get the best out of it and the beast of a camera that is the GFX, but it's a fun journey and I've no regrets about buying this lens.  The 110 F2 sure looks nice, but for me this lens is more flexible in it's use and I sure as hell can't afford both of them!  Thanks for reading.

Coco at the beach

Just a few quick edits from a shoot early in the morning on the beach near Worthing Pier with Coco.  Shot with the GFX and a godox AD200 flash unit.

 

Natural Light shot using direct sun

Natural Light shot using direct sun

Using the Godox AD200 flash and GFX with 32-64mm lens

Using the Godox AD200 flash and GFX with 32-64mm lens

Natural light portrait with GFX and 120 mm F4 lens

Natural light portrait with GFX and 120 mm F4 lens

Shoot with Shannon and a Horse!

I was invited down Brighton way ( again! ) to do a fashion/bridal shoot with Shannon, whom I've worked with before, and some of the team that I worked with on various bridal shoots down that way ( Mode Bridal, Florissima, Sandra Parsons..the full list I will post below ).  The weather was not kind to us, but we managed, here are some shots.

 

Iceland model trip ( NSFW !!)

This is an old one, but still deserves a blog.  I went to Iceland just over a year and a half ago and dragged along the awesome Natasha Felix to model for me.  We went as a group of six, and I did a few shots with the other people on the trip too, Ponyo, Kaz and Vik.  I cannot overstate how awesome Iceland is, every photographer should go there at least once.  It's not that expensive to fly there, but accommodation and food IS expensive.  Gear used for me was a Fuji XT-1, 16mm 1.4 ( I used this ALOT ) and 90mm f2, 56mm 1.2.  Most of that gear is weather sealed and that was super important, as the weather in Iceland changes on a dime and I was often shooting in inclement weather.  Lastly, a big thank you to my models for being incredibly brave, as it was bloody cold out there and they did a stellar job.

 

8am on the glacier, using natural light and the 16mm 1.4

8am on the glacier, using natural light and the 16mm 1.4

90mm f2, I did use a speedlight hear as well. Yes she did get wet.

90mm f2, I did use a speedlight hear as well. Yes she did get wet.

16mm 1.4 and speedlight. Composite image to remove the French rap group in the cockpit.

16mm 1.4 and speedlight. Composite image to remove the French rap group in the cockpit.

90mm f2, natural light

90mm f2, natural light

90mm f2, natural light
90mm f2, composite image to get the blur on the fabric and water. It was cold.

90mm f2, composite image to get the blur on the fabric and water. It was cold.

90mm f2, a different perspective on the plane.

90mm f2, a different perspective on the plane.

Shoot at the Buckle Factory ( NSFW )

This shoot happened a while ago but I've completely forgotten to post about it, even though it was really cool.  There is a studio in London called Beltcraft, which is a natural light studio.  It's pretty awesome, there is loads of junk in the studio which means you can build some really interesting sets.  I took a couple of models with me but one of them was ill, luckily the remaining one is Artemis Fauna who is simply a brilliant model.  For lighting I used my trusty Godox AD360 with the little Octabox modifier.  As always, it worked flawlessly.  Camera used was the Fuji XPro-2 with the 35mm f2, 16mm 1.4 and 56mm 1.2 ( my favourite lens ).  I also used a smoke machine and composited some of the smoke shots with Artemis into one shot.

 

 

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Shoot at the Natural Light Studio in Northampton ( NSFW )

I've been looking for venues for some more natural light/speedlight courses and I'd seen a lot of positive feedback about the Natural Light Space in Northampton.  I decided I needed to check it out and so I booked some models who I had wanted to shoot with for ages, Sakura Star and Laura Draycon.  Camera used was the GFX50S and the 32-64 zoom along with the 120 f4 macro.  I used a godox 360 for most of the lighting, along with a Godox AD200 which I absolutely love, for the backlighting.  Here are some shots.  The studio was great and I'm aiming to go back as soon as I can, so check it out if you fancy a great natural light venue ( they have studio strobes as well ).

 

lauraDliftshot
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Statues Shoot with Phoenix Red - NSFW

I'd been meaning to shoot with Phoenix for ages.  I love creative models who bring more to a shoot than just themselves and Phoenix definitely ticks all the boxes.  She is also a lovely person to get along with, as a I knew from meeting her a few times at the Reading Photography Social.  It's quite important to me when doing a test shoot that I get along well with the model as it just makes the day more fun.  Anyway, my friend Cornerstone ( that's his photographer secret identity ) had found a very interesting location north of Reading.  It was a field, and up the hill in the field were these large statues ( around 12ft tall I'd say ) and a ruined shack.  He was kind enough to take me out there to take a look and I knew I had to do a shoot there.  I took some location shots and showed Pheonix and she brought along some interesting headgear and a red dress to match the yellow field.  Here are the images...

 

PheonixRed-fineart-yellowfield
PheonixRed-mono-headdress
PhoenixRed-mono-artnude1
PhoenixRed-fineart-nude
PheonixRed-color-nude
PhoenixRed-urbex-artnude-mono
PheonixRed-smoke-nude

The photography was relatively simple.  I did take some lights, but it was very harsh light and my normal godox 360 had broken ( since fixed ), so I was down to one speedlight.  I did use it a bit but mostly just used the natural light.  This meant waiting sometimes  for the clouds to give us a bit of cover, or just using the angles to make sure the light hitting Phoenix didn't create unflattering shadows.  I was also conscious that the statues had a meaning and didn't want to treat them without respect so we tried hard to provide a context to the images.  The smoke bombs added some drama and using them was a first for me ( I know, I'm very late to the party ).

Gear used was a Fuji GFX50S, the 120 and 32-64 lenses.  I have to say the colour and dynamic range from this camera is unbelievable and it was a pleasure to use on this shoot.

Fuji GFX50S review ( NSFW )

I figured it was about time I reviewed this beast of a camera, I've been holding off doing so because I've felt, and still do, that there is so much to get to grips with here.  That isn't to say the shooting experience is particularly complex, it really isn't. especially if you are used to the XT-2.  

Most of what you need is on top of the camera, although it's missing the exposure compensation dial and they replaced it with an LCD display which I find a bit superfluous, but I guess if you were shooting in the dark it would be useful.  To be fair, I've not done much straight studio shooting with this camera and I guess in dark studios that LCD might be quite handy, but I'd rather they had kept the exposure compensation dial.  

While we are on gripes, lets deal with the other common gripe with this camera, those strap lugs.  I found the strap got twisted all the time with them, to the extent that I just removed the strap completely.  Although light for a medium format camera I'm not going to be wearing this thing around my neck much.

 

GFX50S 120 mm F4 

GFX50S 120 mm F4 

OK that's pretty much all my negatives out of the way, now lets get to the good stuff.  First off, the main reason you would buy this thing, image quality.  I've used a bunch of cameras over the years, including the D800, 5d3, D750 and almost all the X series cameras, as well as a brief go with a Sony A7.  The images from this thing really do blow them all away, I've seen nothing else like it.  People using the high end phase gear aside, this is the best you can get without selling your children.  Some people have said that the Sony A7r2 comes close, and that may well be the case, but for me, this camera lets me get images that blow my mind, and I still feel as though its part of the Fuji system I'm used to, I don't feel like I'm running two systems side by side.  Some people may be fine with that, but I've always found it a pain.  The sharpness and punch of these images is simply incredible, although much of that is lost as soon as you post it to something like facebook of course.  However, editing these images is such a pleasure, its quite difficult to go back to anything else once you have experienced it.  Certainly I've found with model shoots I'm using it all the time.  Dynamic range is awesome, as expected, and the transitions between highlights and shadows is very subtle, giving the images a certain something that's hard to define, but it's there.

GFX50S 32-64mm f4 

GFX50S 32-64mm f4 

Partly this is down to the lenses.  I've used all 3 of the Fuji ones and they are all stellar in their own way.  The 32-64 zoom is the best zoom in this range I've ever used, by far.  I've used a bunch of 24-70s, which this very roughly equates to, at least in terms of functionality, but this is so much better than all of them.  It feels like using a prime and the sharpness is just amazing.  Its faster to focus than the 63 and I do feel the 63 is a bit pointless if you have the zoom.  Yes, the 63 is a stop wider, but most of the time you don't shoot wider than f4 anyway as the depth of field becomes too narrow.  The zoom then gives you way more flexibility.  You can use it for wider portraits and for landscapes and anything in between.

 

Fuji GFX50S 32-64mm F4

Fuji GFX50S 32-64mm F4

Finally, we have the 120mm f4 Macro.  I did find this a peculiar lens to come out with before the 110 f2, but now I've used it, I feel its the more versatile of the two and I can see why it came out first.  It has image stabilisation, and anyone who has used a Fuji lens with IS will know, it really is superb.  I tend to use the zoom or the 63 on a tripod, but there is no need to with this lens, which is a big bonus.  It's also almost too sharp, and has very good bokeh.  I found that I used this lens more than the others when it came to shooting models and I absolutely love it.  It's not a 1:1 macro, its 1:2, but then you can crop in ALOT which kind of  makes up for it.

 

Fuji GFX50S 120mm f4 macro

Fuji GFX50S 120mm f4 macro

Fuji GFX50S 120mm F4 macro

Fuji GFX50S 120mm F4 macro

The flash sync speed is a little bit of a pain, being 125th of a second rather than the 1/250th on the latest X-series cameras.  However, base ISO is now 100 rather than the 200 found on the X-series.  The problem I found with 1/125th is that unless you are using the 120mm f4, if you are using flash, then you need to use a tripod, and you will probably need ND filters.  However, high speed sync is around the corner courtesy of Godox amongst others.

The other really fun thing about this camera is the amount of adapters already available for third party lenses.  Fotodiox have already released a bunch of them, including Nikon and Canon, and there are adapters for almost everything already out there, with better quality ones on the horizon.  At the moment you are restricted to manual focus, but its a lot easier to manually focus with all the focussing aids being mirrorless brings to the table.  Here is a shot I took on the Samyang 85 1.4 on a recent bridal shoot.

 

GFX50S Samyang 85 1.4 ( Fotodiox adapter )

GFX50S Samyang 85 1.4 ( Fotodiox adapter )

The GFX community have been getting some outstanding results with adapted lenses and this is a really fun aspect of the camera that should not be overlooked, especially if you have some high quality legacy glass hanging around.  If you don't, then the Samyang lenses seem to be a really good buy.  

So what is this thing like to shoot with?  Well, generally, an absolute pleasure, although it will make your shooting experience a bit more sedate.  Battery life is very good, I generally only get through one battery in a days shoot, and I have just one spare battery.  The EVF is excellent and the general handling makes shooting this camera very easy.  Personally, I'm going to be using it for model test shoots, commercial work and certain parts of weddings ( group shots and couple portraits, I've already used it on one engagement shoot ).  I've also got some fine art projects in the pipeline where I'll be printing big for galleries, and this is primarily the reason I bought the camera.  If you are just using instagram and facebook, this camera is a bit pointless for you.  I can say however, that getting into medium format has never been easier or cheaper ( not that it is cheap in any way, until you start comparing it to the competition ).  I absolutely love it and although I'm still working out how to get the best from it, that's a process I'm really enjoying.  Here are a few more images..

 

GFX50S 32-64 mm f4

GFX50S 32-64 mm f4

GFX50S 120mm F4

GFX50S 120mm F4

GFX50S 120mm F4

GFX50S 120mm F4

Shoot at Pozers Studio with Helen Diaz (NSFW)

This was my fourth shoot with Helen, who is as mad as a box of frogs, but also awesome fun to work with.  We mostly did simple studio sets with one or two softboxes, working on some yoga poses and fashion/fashion nude style images.  Cameras used were XPro-2, X100f and XT-2.

 

Welcome

Welcome to Modelography.net!  I decided to separate my model/fashion work from my wedding/commercial work and so this website is born.  This website is all about model photography.  I mostly do tests for agency models, but there are a bunch of other shoots that may creep onto this page, as well as some gear reviews.  I shoot with Fuji cameras, both the XT-2, Xpro-2 and the GFX50s.  I also teach photography, over the last 2 years I've run around 20 workshops and taught a bunch of one to ones, so if you think you would like to learn something from me get in touch.